Meaning of unaligated

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surendran mp IhWYiwSxm8g unsplash

An aliquot is a portion of something that is cut off from the whole. For example, an ounce of water would be an aliquot of a gallon.

 In chemistry, calories are sometimes called “small-aliquots”. When describing a set, such as the set F (the factors of 10),

 one might say that it consists of 10 small-aliquots. This expression makes sense in two ways: 

(1) each aliquot is itself equal to the whole, and

 (2) any individual member chosen at random will have exactly one aliquot among those 10.

The term “unaligned operon” is used in molecular biology to refer to an individual gene that is on a chromosome that is not part of the corresponding operon.

The term “unaligned operon” is used in the same context, but refers specifically to a gene (or other genetic entity) that occurs outside of an operon. 

An aliquot is a portion of something that is cut off from the whole. For example, an ounce of water would be an aliquot of a gallon.

Aliquots 

are used to control and deliver precise amounts of reagents, samples, and other materials.

 They are commonly used in scientific research and industrial applications

Aliquots can be used to prepare solutions of the same concentration as the original reagent, or with a concentration that is modified according to experimental needs.

For example, if a scientist wants to measure exactly three milliliters of ethanol in one hundred milliliters of water 

they could measure out ninety-seven milliliters of water from their stock solution and then add three milliliters from an aliquot

 that has been drawn off from this stock solution. Thus, the three milliliters of ethanol would have a known concentration; 

any variation in the original stock solution would be accounted for by calculating

 the amount of variation in the amount of water added, which is the same as one hundred milliliters.

Aliquots can be used to transfer a sample accurately from one container to another. They also protect against contamination, 

since they prevent unwanted materials from entering into a reaction or experiment.

 For example, aliquots can be used when weighing out chemicals. When only part of a reagent is needed it can be “weighed out”

 into an aliquot part of the original weight before setting aside for future use.

Aliquots (referred to in the United States as “aliquot parts” or “aliquot shares”) are used 

to control and deliver precise amounts of reagents, samples, and other materials. 

Aliquots can be used to

 prepare solutions of the same concentration as the original reagent, 

or with a concentration that is modified according to experimental needs.

For example, if a scientist wants to measure exactly three milliliters of ethanol in one hundred milliliters of water 

they could measure out ninety-seven milliliters of water from their stock solution and then add three milliliters

 from an aliquot that has been drawn off from this stock solution. Thus, the three milliliters of ethanol would have a known concentration; 

any variation in the original stock solution would be accounted for by calculating the amount of variation in the amount of water added, 

which is the same as one hundred milliliters.

Aliquots can be used to transfer a sample accurately from one container to another. 

They also protect against contamination, since they prevent unwanted materials from entering into a reaction or experiment.

For example, aliquots can be used when weighing out chemicals. When only part of a reagent is needed 

it can be “weighed out” into an aliquot part of the original weight before setting aside for future use. unaligated

Stevia rebaudiana (sweetleaf stevia) is a perennial herb native to Paraguay and Argentina, 

where it grows in humid forest habitats near streams. The plant’s leaves are swollen and covered with sticky glands containing steviol glycosides, 

which give the plants their sweetness. Stevia is a bio-crop, and is being developed as an alternative crop for production of steviol glycosides, 

in much the same way that coffee is a major source of caffeine.

Aquifoliaceae is a very large family of flowering plants with about 1350 species of trees and shrubs, including hollies and St. John’s wort. 

The family contains 23 genera worldwide, with the highest diversity in South America, tropical Asia and pantropical Africa. 

The largest genera are Ilex (250 species) and Symphoricarpos (200 species).

All Aquifoliaceae have opposite, evergreen leaves and small, greenish flowers of unisexual or sometimes bisexual types. 

The fruit is a berry (rarely a drupe). Some species are cultivated for ornament, either as trees or trained to grow over walls.

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