Seven Lessons I’ve Learned From Enterprise Software

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The world of enterprise software is an intimidating one to get started in. It seems like you have to research and learn about so many other aspects of the industry than just the product itself. However, I’ve learned some valuable lessons from my time in this field that anyone starting out should know.

Whether you’re considering a position with a new company or looking to switch to a new role, there are plenty of lessons that will be useful when you begin your journey in the world of enterprise software. What was the core business that made standard oil a horizontally integrated monopoly? Who was the first person to file a patent, and on what? What is the most valuable type of organization, market structure or network architecture in a monopoly? What are some ways to distinguish between similar products in an industry?

The answers to these questions and more are highly dependent upon your new position. Large companies typically have a high number of diverse interests in different industries. You’ll need to learn about the history of your company as well as that industry overall. Researching historical figures, patents and events will help you feel comfortable with the role you’re about to take on. Determining price points for those specific products will come through research on the industry itself, so knowing your way around it will take more than simple reading.

Seven Lessons I’ve Learned From Enterprise Software :

1. Understand the Business of Your Company

The most important thing to know when you begin working in enterprise software is what exactly the core business is. It may be more than one. A lot of companies work in different verticals of the market, have their hands in different supply chains, or try to expand into different geographic regions. Know who your company works with and how it makes money. If you’re going to be selling a product, don’t just list features and benefits; explain how this product solves a problem for your customer and how it makes money as a direct result.

2. Know the History of Your Industry

Contrary to what most people think, technology has a long history in the world. Take this time to research the evolution of your industry and choose some seminal figures that come to mind when you think of it as an idea. Starting with Isaac Newton, Charles Babbage and John Von Neumann are great examples. Knowing these formative figures will help you understand why your company is where it is today, and maybe even further back in origins.

3. Follow the Money

Understanding a company’s financial performance will help when you’re designing new products. Using historical results can show you how much revenue a product has produced in the past, and how much of that revenue comes from your company. Use statistics, graphs and charts to find these results, and then use them to plan out future products or projects. You can even use your knowledge of it to make projections for future growth.

4. Know There are Different Market Structures

When it comes to enterprise software in particular, there are two different market structures that need to be known about: a monopoly and oligopoly. Both require different thinking when designing products, but again know the difference between them before diving into anything else.

5. Know How to Differentiate Products

There’s a lot of focus on feature lists and benefits when it comes to selling enterprise software, but that’s just not enough. Take a look at competitors and what they’re doing, their prices and statistics. Find out how anyone else is trying to solve the same problems you do, so you can create something unique. Know why people buy your product over other similar ones, and use that information to build a better product for yourself.

6. Understand Different Network Architectures

Different types of networks exist within an industry for every different kind of product there is in the world. Knowing the different types will help you organize your product better and find a new way to approach problems.

7. Learn Where You Fit In

This is another important lesson that comes from being on the inside of an industry. If you’re going to be working in enterprise software, understand not only your role as a developer but also what kind of technical skills you need to succeed in it. Whether you want knowledge on sales, QA or architecture, learn as many things as you can that will help you develop into these functions better. On top of having more responsibilities, knowing more about an entire industry will help open up these avenues for advancement down the line.

The world of enterprise software is an intimidating one to get started in. It seems like you have to research and learn about so many other aspects of the industry than just the product itself. However, I’ve learned some valuable lessons from my time in this field that anyone starting out should know.

Whether you’re considering a position with a new company or looking to switch to a new role, there are plenty of lessons that will be useful when you begin your journey in the world of enterprise software. What was the core business that made standard oil a horizontally integrated monopoly? Who was the first person to file a patent, and on what? What is the most valuable type of organization, market structure or network architecture in a monopoly? What are some ways to distinguish between similar products in an industry?

The answers to these questions and more are highly dependent upon your new position. Large companies typically have a high number of diverse interests in different industries. You’ll need to learn about the history of your company as well as that industry overall. Researching historical figures, patents and events will help you feel comfortable with the role you’re about to take on. Determining price points for those specific products will come through research on the industry itself, so knowing your way around it will take more than simple reading.

Seven Lessons I’ve Learned From Enterprise Software :

1. Understand the Business of Your Company

The most important thing to know when you begin working in enterprise software is what exactly the core business is. It may be more than one. A lot of companies work in different verticals of the market, have their hands in different supply chains, or try to expand into different geographic regions. Know who your company works with and how it makes money. If you’re going to be selling a product, don’t just list features and benefits; explain how this product solves a problem for your customer and how it makes money as a direct result.

2. Know the History of Your Industry

Contrary to what most people think, technology has a long history in the world. Take this time to research the evolution of your industry and choose some seminal figures that come to mind when you think of it as an idea. Starting with Isaac Newton, Charles Babbage and John Von Neumann are great examples. Knowing these formative figures will help you understand why your company is where it is today, and maybe even further back in origins.

3. Follow the Money

Understanding a company’s financial performance will help when you’re designing new products. Using historical results can show you how much revenue a product has produced in the past, and how much of that revenue comes from your company. Use statistics, graphs and charts to find these results, and then use them to plan out future products or projects. You can even use your knowledge of it to make projections for future growth.

4. Know There are Different Market Structures

When it comes to enterprise software in particular, there are two different market structures that need to be known about: a monopoly and oligopoly. Both require different thinking when designing products, but again know the difference between them before diving into anything else.

5. Know How to Differentiate Products

There’s a lot of focus on feature lists and benefits when it comes to selling enterprise software, but that’s just not enough. Take a look at competitors and what they’re doing, their prices and statistics. Find out how anyone else is trying to solve the same problems you do, so you can create something unique. Know why people buy your product over other similar ones, and use that information to build a better product for yourself.

6. Understand Different Network Architectures

Different types of networks exist within an industry for every different kind of product there is in the world. Knowing the different types will help you organize your product better and find a new way to approach problems.

7. Learn Where You Fit In

This is another important lesson that comes from being on the inside of an industry. If you’re going to be working in enterprise software, understand not only your role as a developer but also what kind of technical skills you need to succeed in it. Whether you want knowledge on sales, QA or architecture, learn as many things as you can that will help you develop into these functions better. On top of having more responsibilities, knowing more about an entire industry will help open up these avenues for advancement down the line.

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